Why Are You The Way That You Are? Impulsivity And Its Genetic Factors

Have you ever thought about the science behind impulsivity? Could it be predictive of future mental illness? Well, scientists at McGill University have potentially identified a piece of the puzzle—the concept of impulse control correlates with specific DCC gene co-expression networks. In fact, an increasing number of studies demonstrate a significant association between this gene and several psychiatric disorders.  The DCC gene provides instructions for … Continue reading Why Are You The Way That You Are? Impulsivity And Its Genetic Factors

Research, Medical School, Motherhood and More: Jennifer Thalappillil’s Journey

This week’s post features Jennifer Thalappillil. Jennifer is an award winning scientist and PhD candidate at Stony Brook University’s Department of Pharmacological Sciences. She has won an F31 NIH Fellowship and Stony Brook’s SUNY GREAT award. She was also chosen to present her work at the Annual Meeting for the American Association For Cancer Research (AACR) as well as at Regeneron’s Science to Medicine (STM) … Continue reading Research, Medical School, Motherhood and More: Jennifer Thalappillil’s Journey

You can print that?! 3D Bioprinting in Medicine

This summer a 20-year old woman received the first 3D printed implant made from living tissues. The patient was born with microtia, a rare condition that alters the development of the outer ear. As a result, she was missing most of her left ear. Microtia affects 1,500 children in the United States each year. Due to closure or absence of the ear canal, microtia can … Continue reading You can print that?! 3D Bioprinting in Medicine

 Tuskegee: An Anniversary

2022 marks the 50th anniversary of the atrocities of the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Study being brought to light in an expose by Jean Heller. “For 40 years the U.S. Public Health Service has conducted a study in which human guinea pigs, denied proper medical treatment, have died of syphilis and its side effects.” -Jean Heller, lede of “Syphilis Victims in U.S. Study Went Untreated for … Continue reading  Tuskegee: An Anniversary

Neoadjuvant Immunotherapy Trial Eliminates Cancer in all Subjects

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the United States, and affects approximately 150,000 patients each year. Even though fatality rates among men and women have been decreasing over time, colorectal cancer remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death.  Recently published results of a phase II clinical trial led by Andrea Cercek, MD, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, identified 14 … Continue reading Neoadjuvant Immunotherapy Trial Eliminates Cancer in all Subjects

The Triumphs and Trials of Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery

AI is highly applicable and compatible with drug discovery methods. Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) are two techniques that are quickly being integrated into various research practices, including drug discovery and development (1). AI refers to machines or systems, typically software, that mimics human thinking to perform tasks while ML is a facet of AI that allows machines/systems to collect data and learn … Continue reading The Triumphs and Trials of Artificial Intelligence in Drug Discovery

From Veterinary Medicine to Neuroscience: Meet Noele Certain

This week’s post features Noele Certain. Noele is an award-winning scientist from the Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology Program, as well as an active participant in graduate school as a GSO senator, mentor, and mentee. Noele’s academic background is in Biology, with a Bachelor of Science in Biology from St. Joseph’s College, as well as a Master of Science in Biochemistry and Cell Biology from Stony … Continue reading From Veterinary Medicine to Neuroscience: Meet Noele Certain

Takeaways from FACES 2022

FACES (Facilitating Awareness: Career Exploration for Scientists) is a career exploration and networking event created by graduate students for graduate students. It brings together panelists with diverse career trajectories to discuss their experiences in graduate school and the paths they took to their chosen field. It provides students the opportunity to seek advice and plan their next steps.  This year’s panelists were all early career … Continue reading Takeaways from FACES 2022

How Climate Change Affects Drug Discovery

This year, the Great Barrier Reef has been hit with its sixth mass bleaching event. Widespread bleaching was previously observed in 1998, 2002, 2016, 2017, and 2020, but scientists are especially concerned because this year marks the first time a mass bleaching event has occurred during a relatively cooler year.  Reef bleaching is usually caused by warmer temperatures, pollution, and runoff. As a result, coral … Continue reading How Climate Change Affects Drug Discovery

Staying Sane During Grad School: My Identity as (not just) a Graduate Student

You are not defined by graduate school. Say it louder for the people in the back…you are NOT defined by your identity as a graduate student. This took me quite some time to realize—three years, to be exact. I was (somewhat) content waking up in the mornings, driving 50 minutes to Stony Brook, going to classes and performing experiments or lab-related work for 8-10 hours … Continue reading Staying Sane During Grad School: My Identity as (not just) a Graduate Student